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Chief Editor -
Abdulrazak Abyad MD, MPH, MBA, AGSF, AFCHSE

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Lesley Pocock
medi+WORLD International
Doonan 4562
Australia
Email
: lesleypocock@mediworld.com.au
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abyad@cyberia.net.lb
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Volume 7, Issue 2, November 2016


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Editorial

Dr Abdul Abyad
Chief Editor

Email: aabyad@cyberia.net.lb


A study from Oman aimed to determine the predictors of the length of inpatient hospital admission following deliberate self-harm (DSH).

Theirs was a retrospective study of medical notes for all patients admitted from Jan 20012 to Jan 2014 with DSH who were reviewed for sociodemographic information, clinical diagnosis and length of hospital admission.

The total number of records reported during the three-year period was 117 patients, 102 (87%) were Omani, and 15 (12.8%) were non-Omani. The mean age was 23.5, and the rate of DSH was the highest in the age group 15-24 (65.8%) and the lowest in the age group <15 (1.7%). The pharmacological method was commonly used (82.9%), and analgesics accounted for 36.1% of this. Of the total sample, 28% had previous self-harm. More than half of the cases were admitted for 1-2 days. There was a significant association between the short hospital stay and pharmacological method. In contrast, psychiatric diagnosis was found to be a predictor for longer stay of more than four days.

They concluded the rate of self-harm is increasing in Oman with the analgesic use remaining the commonest method of self-harm. The predictors of longer inpatient stay should be considered in the DSH prevention programs to reduce the avoidable burden.

A review from Iran looked at the high regional rates of self immolation. It suggests that each case of self-immolation reflects a voice that has not been heard or a demand that has not been fulfilled. As a result, each case of self-immolation mirrors that we as human beings have already hugely disappointed one of our fellow human beings for various reasons.

A second paper from Oman, provides a cautionary case study about steroid induced psychosis. The article discusses the case of a 21 years old female patient, without any previous psychiatric history. She was admitted with psychosis a week after the administration of 60 mg/day of prednisolone for ulcerative colitis. The sudden onset of the symptoms,

their quick response to the discontinuation of prednisolone and antipsychotic therapy and the complete recovery of the patient support the diagnosis of corticosteroid-induced psychosis. The patient's medical history and the lab findings excluded other etiological factors. She was treated with olanzapine, an atypical antipsychotic, because of her distinct psychotic symptoms, and she showed significant improvement.

Finally an opinion piece from Lebanon discusses the issues of war and peace -a seemingly perpetual cycle of humanity.




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